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11.19.2020 / Safety « Back to all articles

Do You Need a Will?
Do You Need a Will? How to Write a Will.

It's not always easy to start thinking about what will happen to your property and possessions after you pass, but if you want certain loved ones in your life to receive specific property of yours, having a will is indispensable. Whether you're nearing retirement age or have just started in the workforce, drafting a will can sometimes seem like a far-off item on the to-do list or something that isn't relevant yet. However, given that it's impossible to know what the future holds, starting a will sooner rather than later can help protect your estate in the event of your passing, and can give you and your loved ones some peace of mind, knowing that the details have already been worked out. 
 

Wills Spell Out Where Your Assets Go 

You might not think that you have the assets needed to merit a will, but assets cover a surprising range of financially valuable items. These can include: 

  • Your retirement accounts 

  • Your home furniture or works of art 

  • Investments such as stocks 

  • Your house and any other properties you may own 

  • Your bank accounts 

  • Other valuable items like automobiles or jewelry 

It may seem like it should be clear-cut what happens to all of these possessions in the event of death, but if you want a specific asset to go to someone you love, a will is the best way to make this abundantly clear. This helps prevent confusion and possible litigation after your passing. 
 

You Can Help Provide Family Care 

Wills are commonly known for distributing possessions, but you might not have known that they can include provisions for family care as well. For instance, if you have kids, you can use your will to name guardians for them, helping to ensure they’ll be well looked after. Similarly, you can include provisions for any beloved pets. 
 

You Can Decide Who Doesn't Receive Assets 

You know by now that a will dictates where your assets end up, but it’s helpful to note that they can also spell out who doesn’t receive anything. For instance, if you’re divorced and you don’t want your ex-spouse to receive certain assets, you can specify this in your will. 

Maybe you think you’re too young to need a will yet, or that you don’t have the assets required to draft a will. However, anyone can benefit from having a will, regardless of the amount of property you own, since spelling out these details ahead of time can help save your family and friends from a potential headache when you eventually pass. If you’re mulling over getting a will and aren’t sure whether now is the right time, you can use this valuable guide to inform your decision-making process and help you find the option that works best for you and your family. 

11.24.2020 / Borrowing

Falling Behind on Your Mortgage? Read This
When economic times are tough, it's easy to start falling behind on crucial monthly payments, including your mortgage.…

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11.19.2020 / Safety « Back to all articles

Do You Need a Will?
Do You Need a Will? How to Write a Will.

It's not always easy to start thinking about what will happen to your property and possessions after you pass, but if you want certain loved ones in your life to receive specific property of yours, having a will is indispensable. Whether you're nearing retirement age or have just started in the workforce, drafting a will can sometimes seem like a far-off item on the to-do list or something that isn't relevant yet. However, given that it's impossible to know what the future holds, starting a will sooner rather than later can help protect your estate in the event of your passing, and can give you and your loved ones some peace of mind, knowing that the details have already been worked out. 
 

Wills Spell Out Where Your Assets Go 

You might not think that you have the assets needed to merit a will, but assets cover a surprising range of financially valuable items. These can include: 

  • Your retirement accounts 

  • Your home furniture or works of art 

  • Investments such as stocks 

  • Your house and any other properties you may own 

  • Your bank accounts 

  • Other valuable items like automobiles or jewelry 

It may seem like it should be clear-cut what happens to all of these possessions in the event of death, but if you want a specific asset to go to someone you love, a will is the best way to make this abundantly clear. This helps prevent confusion and possible litigation after your passing. 
 

You Can Help Provide Family Care 

Wills are commonly known for distributing possessions, but you might not have known that they can include provisions for family care as well. For instance, if you have kids, you can use your will to name guardians for them, helping to ensure they’ll be well looked after. Similarly, you can include provisions for any beloved pets. 
 

You Can Decide Who Doesn't Receive Assets 

You know by now that a will dictates where your assets end up, but it’s helpful to note that they can also spell out who doesn’t receive anything. For instance, if you’re divorced and you don’t want your ex-spouse to receive certain assets, you can specify this in your will. 

Maybe you think you’re too young to need a will yet, or that you don’t have the assets required to draft a will. However, anyone can benefit from having a will, regardless of the amount of property you own, since spelling out these details ahead of time can help save your family and friends from a potential headache when you eventually pass. If you’re mulling over getting a will and aren’t sure whether now is the right time, you can use this valuable guide to inform your decision-making process and help you find the option that works best for you and your family. 

Need a
Loan?

Loans from $120 to $15,000. Get funded as soon as today!

11.24.2020 / Borrowing

Falling Behind on Your Mortgage? Read This
When economic times are tough, it's easy to start falling behind on crucial monthly payments, including your mortgage.…